Publications

The High Representative’s role in EU countering terrorism – Policy Entrepreneurship and thick, thin and global Europe

Abstract

This article examines the role of the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (HR) in the counter terrorism agenda and how it has been whittled according to the multiplicity and complexity of the several terrorism related crises in Europe, from Javier Solana to Federica Mogherini, following this special issue four faces taxonomy of Europe. It addresses how the different HRs explored terrorism as an existential threat and assesses their performance following Kingdon’s policy entrepreneurship framework and Mintrom’s research on policy entrepreneurship. It aspires to understand the hybrid nature and performance of the HRs as an institutional figure within the four faces of Europe framework and how the EU’s complex institutional structure stretches policy boundaries and compels the use of different decision-making mechanisms to deal with domestic, external and foreign components of counter-terrorism according to different materialisations of Europe’s Self and Others.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Politics and Society
Early online date13 Nov 2020
DOIshttps://doi.org/10.1080/23745118.2020.1842695
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print – 13 Nov 2020

Thick Europe, ontological security and parochial Europe: the re-emergence of far-right extremism and terrorism after the refugee crisis of 2015

Abstract

European integration. The European Union (EU) becoming a grievance factor for far-right extremism and terror is qualitatively new. This article examines the emergence of this new actor in line with the changing four faces of the EU presented in this special issue, namely thin, thick, parochial and global. Paradoxically, the core argument of this article is that moves towards thick Europe have contributed to this development by way of addressing core fears in Europe after the migration/refugee crisis in 2015. The chronological discourse of the construction of the EU’s identity has showed that since 2014, there has been a major shift regarding Europeans’ fears and anxieties. (In)security linked to the migration/refugee crisis has been widening the market for security, despite the contrasting fact that Europe has been thriving for the longest peace period since WWII. This article analyses the impacts of the refugee crisis on the mutation of the European perception of threats. It uses the concept of ontological security to understand how the anxiety and fear caused by the refugee crisis led to the shaping of the European self-identity crisis.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Politics and Society
DOIshttps://doi.org/10.1080/23745118.2020.1842699
Publication statusAccepted/In press – 30 Jun 2020
  • Europe, ontological security, refugee crisis, terrorism, far-right

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